Articles Tagged with broker misconduct

A former Wells Fargo registered representative in Daytona, Ohio is facing charges by the Securities and Exchange Commission for defrauding investors out of over a million dollars in a fraudulent scheme that targeted seniors. The SEC filed a complaint against John Gregory Schmidt with the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio on Tuesday. Allegedly, Mr. Schmidt made unauthorized sales and withdrawals from variable annuities to use the proceeds for covering shortfalls in other customer accounts. While Mr. Schmidt allegedly received over $230,000 in commissions, his customers were unaware of the transactions. When the scheme unraveled, it is reported that involved investors discovered that the account balances provided by their trusted financial adviser were false. Our investor fraud attorneys are currently investigating into customer claims against Mr. Schmidt.

The SEC complaint alleges that John Gregory Schmidt sold securities from seven of his investors and transferred proceeds to other customer accounts. Most of the securities were variable annuities that required letters of authorization, which Mr. Schmidt is alleged to have forged without client consent. Instead of notifying certain clients of their dwindling account balances, Mr. Schmidt allegedly sent false account statements and permitted excessive withdrawals. Unbeknownst to the client with account shortfalls, it is charged that the received money was illegally retrieved from other customer accounts. The SEC claims that Mr. Schmidt’s misrepresentations violate federal securities laws, including Section 10(b) of the Exchange Act and Exchange Act Rule 10b-5.

It is important to note that John Gregory Schmidt’s alleged fraudulent actions appear to have targeted some of the most vulnerable people in society. Mr. Schmidt, who is 65 years old, ran a fraudulent scheme that targeted elderly victims not too far off from his age, according to the complaint. Several of his reported victims were suffering from medical conditions such as Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. Tragically, at least five of the defrauded investors have passed away and will never be able to see justice served.

This week, it has been reported that the Department of Labor proposed tougher laws after issuing new regulations requiring financial advisors and brokers managing 401k and retirement accounts to act in the best interest of their clients. These rules were proposed a year ago and after deliberating on it for a year, the White House has finalized these tougher requirements. However, it might be a year before these rules go into effect.

An academic study commissioned by the White House revealed that “conflicts of interest” in financial investing was costing Americans about $17 billion a year in retirement savings. Although brokers are required to only recommend “suitable” investments under the current “suitability standard”, they can push a more expensive product that pays a higher commission than a cheaper fund that would be equally appropriate for that investor.

The new rule fiduciary rule is aimed to at reducing fees and commissions that erode retirement savings and hold brokers to higher standards. It will cast a wider net on who is subject to the fiduciary standard.

 The securities fraud attorneys at Malecki Law would like to hear from investors who have complaints against John T. Keyser of Dawson James Securities in Florida. In the past, Keyser has been the subject of a FINRA suspension and customer dispute, as well as an outstanding tax lien. Since 1986 he has been at 16 brokerage firms, including 3 that were expelled from the industry. His current firm has 7 regulatory and 1 arbitration disclosure. Two other firms he has worked with had a combined 30 regulatory & 9 arbitration disclosures on BrokerCheck.

According to FINRA’s BrokerCheck, there were customer dispute cases against him in 2010, 2006, and 2002. Further, as per FINRA’s BrokerCheck, in 2010 there were allegations made against him for churning, intentional and negligent misrepresentation, unsuitability, breach of fiduciary duty, and unauthorized trading, seeking damages for $650,000. As per BrokerCheck, the firm and Keyser denied the wrongdoings and refuted the allegations. FINRA’s BrokerCheck shows that in 2006 there was another customer dispute against him, alleging that a stop loss order had not been executed timely to cover his client’s position. The same FINRA site reveals that in 2002, there was an unauthorized trading complaint made against him, demanding damages of 80,000.

There are other disclosure events, regulatory investment and judgement liens, against his records on BrokerCheck, one of which resulted in NASD suspending his license for failure to pay an arbitration award, which was resolved upon award payment. It is noteworthy that on BrokerCheck several Florida firms Mr. Keyser has worked for in the past have been expelled by FINRA including Sterling Financial Investment Group and Barron Chase Securities.